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Ivgi & Greben

Already during their individual dance careers with the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company and the Dutch National Ballet, the Israeli Uri Ivgi and the Dutch Johan Greben each started a successful career as choreographer. After his first piece ‘Isch-Ischa’ Ivgi was repeatedly invited to create for the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company and the Suzanne Dellal Centre in Israel. In 1998 he received the Award for Upcoming Choreographic Talent from the Ministry of Culture in Israel. In 2001/02 Ivgi won the Public Award with his duet ‘Longing’ during the International Competition for Choreographers in Groningen, The Netherlands and the second prize during the Choreographers Competition in Hannover in Germany. Greben received both the Encouragement Prize Choreography from the Amsterdam Foundation for Arts as well as the Wim Barry Perspective Award for his first piece ‘Straks’ for the Dutch National Ballet. In 1996 he won the third prize with his duet ‘610’ during the Choreographers Competition in Gelsenkirchen, DE.

The first collaboration of Ivgi & Greben took place in 2003 with a new version of ‘Carmen’ for the Szeged Contemporary Dance Company in Hungary. ‘Carmen’ was received with great success on several international festivals. Since 2003 they created for Ballett am Rhein, DE; Dansgroep Amsterdam, Introdans, Scapino Ballet NL; It dansa, ES; Korea National Contemporary Dance Company, SKR; Modern Dance Turkey, TR; National Theatre Ballet, Prague Chamber Ballet, CZ; Provincial Dances Theatre, RU; Phoenix Dance Theatre, Scottish Dance Theatre, Scottish Ballet, GB; Skânes Dansteater, Norrdans SE; Ballet Junior de Geneva, Tanzkompanie Theater St. Gallen, Tanzcomagnie Konzert Theater Bern, CH.

In 2011, Ivgi & Greben won The Golden Mask Award in Moscow in the category Best Choreographer-Ballet/Contemporary Dance. They received this most prestigious Russian Theatre Prize for ‘This Is Not A Love Song’, which they created for the Provincial Dances Theatre in Yekaterinburg.

In 2014 and 2015 Ivgi & Greben worked as artistic leaders of the Rozbark Dance and Movement Theatre in Poland. The recreation of their successful production ‘This Is Not A Love Song’ was nominated as best production of the year. To develop audiences for contemporary dance in Poland, they created ‘I Give You My Heart’, a production presented in public spaces, in -and outdoors. They also initiated the festival, Rozbark in Motion combined with a training program for dancers and choreographers. Ivgi & Greben presented the company in Germany, France and The Netherlands.

In 2018 Ivgi & Greben produced the full-evening production We Are In Trouble in The Netherlands with a very successful premiere in the European Capital of Europe Leeuwarden 2018. In 2019 they will be producing their second independent work ‘The Dreamers’ with a planned premier in September 2019.

Ivgi & Greben present their ideas and thoughts through an imaginative body vocabulary combined with poetic images that build and break, and touch and confront. They consider their work to be a mirror for their audience as well as themselves and so invite the audience to search for a personal reflection of reality. Using themes such as oppression, tension between individuals and groups, longing for freedom and love, and sexuality and acceptance, Ivgi & Greben create a visual world blending movement, music, light and costumes into an aesthetic of their own. By breaking boundaries and using intense physicality, their choreography achieves a tapestry representing control, power, strength and endurance interwoven with moments of softness, intimacy and tenderness.

 

Uri Ivgi (Israel)

(click here for a detailed CV)

After studying theater and sculpture Uri Ivgi started his dance education at the school of the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company in 1987. From 1990 until 1997 Uri danced with the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company and performed pieces by Rami Be’er, Mats Ek, Daniel Ezralow, Jiri Kylian, Suzanna Linke, Inbal Pinto and many others. Uri created his first choreography, Isch-Ischa, in 1993 and was subsequently repeatedly invited to create new work for the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company as well as the Suzanne Dellal Centre (Tel Aviv, Israel). In 1998 Uri received the first prize for best dancer during the International Competition for Choreographers as well as an award for Upcoming Talented Choreographer from the Ministry of Culture. In the same year he moved to the Netherlands to establish and fully focus on his career as a choreographer. After a successful start he was supported by several Dutch foundations and invited to create new works for several festivals, companies and schools all over Europe. In 2001 he entered the International Competition for Choreographers in Groningen, The Netherlands, with his duet Longing and won the public award. The same duet won him second prize during the Choreographers Competition in Hannover, Germany, in 2002.

Uri: “I am fascinated by situations involving people in defined spaces. I like to create on the basis of physical communication, working through feelings, intuition and visual ability. I show by example, motivating dancers to take it one step further by adding their own personal touch.”

Johan Greben (The Netherlands)

(click here for a detailed CV)

Johan Greben started his dancing career with the Dutch National Ballet in 1985 and performed pieces by Frederick Ashton, George Balanchine, Carolyn Carlson, Nils Christe, Rudi van Dantzig, William Forsythe, Martha Graham, Edouard Lock, Hans van Manen, Krzystof Pastor, Toer van Schayk and many others. In 1989 Johan created his first choreography Later (Straks) for the Dutch National Ballet. Later won him both the Encouragement Prize for Choreography from the Amsterdam Foundation for the Arts as well as the Wim Barry Perspective Award. He subsequently created a number of pieces for various companies, schools and festivals. Since 1995 Johan worked as an independent choreographer, winning third prize with his duet 610 during the Choreographers Competition in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, in 1996. He combines his creative work with teaching technique and improvisation as well as coaching and guiding young dancers and choreographers.

Johan: “Over the years I have had a growing interest in communicating with the observer; my audience. How to extract dance from its esthetic vacuum wrapping and expose ideas to the audience? What should I leave out in order to make movement significant? Through movement I look for forms and mechanisms of meaning with which I can arouse feelings in the audience.”